Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings is hot property at the moment - everyone is buying into it. Hate it or love it, movie merchandising and related advertising is big bucks, and as such, bound to happen. Certain movies have a better chance for a successful franchise, based on a number of factors.

There's conflict over the best way to prime a miniature, which goes to suggest that people will fight over any damn thing that has more than one option available. And while this perhaps doesn't have the broad, metaphysical qualities of a debate like Coke vs. Pepsi (vs. RC vs. Chek Cola vs. etc.) it's just the thing for the mini-gamer who's sick of the typical: a balanced approach.

No one could ever accuse RPG characters of having boring lives. They go on quests, slay dragons, save entire kingdoms, win treasure and other fabulous prizes, and (usually) live to regale their friends with the tale over a pint or three at the local inn. But if you look a little closer you'll find that the lives of most gaming characters lack something that is a major (and some would say essential) part of the average person's life: love.

Bad horror film. Bad romance film. Bad historical film. Bad action film. Wonderful fantasy film. That's really the only way I can describe Brotherhood of the Wolf (Le Pacte des Loups), a French film about a werewolf that's not a werewolf, two hunters who aren't hunters, a conspiracy that's not really a conspiracy, and a plot that's just begging to be stolen for your role-playing group. Shhhh. Don't tell your players!

For the new year, we're starting a brand new feature here at Gamegrene.com. Our Open Forum is a place for you, our readers, to post your comments and chat with other readers about whatever strikes your fancy. Got a game-related website you want to plug? Want to talk about this summer's glut of fantasy and sci-fi sequels? Interested in discussing a console or PC game that's slipped our notice? This is the place to do it.

I am not among the world's more organized people. In fact, though I know only a small portion of the people in the world, I would bet money that I am among the least organized. I also have the memory retention of an autistic goldfish. This usually doesn't bother me, except when it comes to gaming, and more specifically, GMing. As such, I have compiled a list of resolutions, that I may improve my overall organization and memory and be a better GM. The fact that I have compiled a list of resolutions so far from the New Year should be further testament to my state of disorganization.

Imagine taking a final exam in your favorite subject at school. You like the subject matter, and you're sure that when it's all over, you're going to like the results. But it's still a lot of work to get through the whole experience, and when it's all over you can't help but feel exhausted. The new film version of Lord of the Rings is just like that.

We've tried to make it as innocent, and unchanging as possible. We've checked all our URLs, duplicated all our features, and prayed pathetically to our liege. Yes, the entire backend of Gamegrene.com has changed. What have we broke?

 
 

I considered a snazzy title for this article, like "Ghoulashly Fun" or "Ghoul to the Last Drop", but the game's title already has some sort of play on words (that quite frankly is still beyond me), so that seemed like overkill. Either way, this game is really a simple, easy to learn, down to earth strategy game that is cheap, convenient, and pretty fun.

Some books have witty titles, and some have generic titles. Some have titles that live forever, entering into our collective culture, and some have bad titles that die ingloriously. Rules To Live By: Supernatural is the first supplement published for the Rules To Live By generic LARPing system.

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