Gyll Hill

From Ghyll
Revision as of 13:32, 30 January 2005 by Jcowan (Talk | contribs)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search

Etymologically unrelated to "Ghyll", as was proven by Ramingotes and Fondal in -35 EC, Gyll Hill is one of the many pseudo-places used on surveys, usage metering forms, personality tests, and other official paperwork that bored Ghyllians want not to fill in seriously. Though many other pseudo-places are used from time to time--amongst them Cheeks' Gap, Suckit Ho, Unkey's Muncle, Little Dingle, and Much Laffing--Gyll Hill is by far the most common.

Gyll Hill has been woven tightly into popular culture since its first use on a female privvy [sic] manuscript of the late -130s, wherein manwhores of Gyll Hill are lewdly and raucously panegyrised. The Rock And Toe Band minstrels mention it in their popular song "Antiquated Wind". Candi Rapper recently mentioned it several times in her best selling novel My Little Oblong Fantasy. And several members of the Hill family of the small village of Cranee have been named for Gyll Hill, including the Cranee Historical Society's current president.

The Folktown Records has for many years contained a famous but mysterious joke advertisement for Gyll Hill signed by an enigmatic person calling themselves Canonical Goo--presumably an arcane pseudonym. After extolling Gyll Hill's virtues in a uniquely hilarious manner every edition, Goo rounds off with the slogan: "Had your fill of the rest of Ghyll? Come to Gyll Hill!"

Ironically, every time an adventurer discovers a new hill on the Ghyll exploratory frontiers past the Sarfelogian Mountains, they're compelled to name it Gyll Hill in the absence of any other suitable name--celebrities, important figures, letters, numbers, star names, and so forth having been exhausted. Thus there are currently two-thousand-and-thirty-eight charted Gyll Hills, making frontiersperson cartographers' lives rather difficult as they struggle to create new footnote symbols to distinguish between them all.

On questioning, lead cartographer Bob Phanqué--known also as the inventor of fecksadecimal, the numbering system for counting sexual intercourse frequency--said, "we may very well be getting to the limit of the amount of scribbles acceptable under core script graphonomy rules. And sexteen times per day on average this week, now that you ask."

Citations: Folktown Records, Odlucian Library, Sarfelogian Mountains.

--Sean B. Palmer 18:06, 27 Oct 2004 (EDT)

Footnotes

† Now on display in the highly controversial Journey Up Ecstasy Lane exhibit in the Odlucian Library.

Personal tools