Unquisition

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"Why go out to find information when someone will bring it to you?" --Zed Varren

After these words first came to the mind of Zed Varren, he knew he had struck something big. "Why shouldn't everyone else do research and just give me the information?" he thought, "I wonder what I should call it." After searching through the dictionary, Zed Varren came across the word "Inquisition - The act of inquiring into a manner". After reading this definition, Mr. Varren had found the name for his idea: Unquisition - The act of having everyone else inquire into matters for you.

The Unquisition started out slowly, with only a few scholarly friends to Zed giving him information on a regular basis. Zed took in this information and kept track of it. As word got out about Mr. Varren and his information harvesting, more scholars looked to Mr. Varren to keep track of their data, thinking that it would be in better hands to be preserved.

As more and more people started sending Zed information about everything from theoarcheology and AuroAnthropology to morphomancy and burnflies, Zed could no longer handle the thousands of documents and texts piling up in his small home. He began calling libraries throughout Ghyll asking if they would allow him to use some of their space to store all of this information. The Odlucian Library jumped at this idea, thinking that allowing more forgetful scholars to use their facilities would result in more overdue book fees.

Today, the Unquisition is considered to be the most extensive archive of information in all of Ghyll, with entries from every noteworthy scholar. The number of documents and texts from all subject areas within the archives require the Unquisition to be held within a separate wing of the Odlucian library. The Unquisition still has an open policy for submissions, as long as the information is not already duplicated within the archives, and that surely is a difficult task to manage.

Citations: AuroAnthropology, Morphomancy, Zed Varren.

--Leonard J. Keatings 23:55, 18 Mar 2005 (EST)

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