The first part of a series of "How-I" articles. This specific article covers what I (as a GM) determine regarding the campaign before I invite players to it. An ambitious, generous, or ambivalent GM might discuss these things with his/her potential players and collect feedback, but it's not a democracy; the GM should enjoy the game also. Some GMs refer to the topics covered within this as a prospectus. "How-to" implies that there is a best way. There might be, and this might be it, or maybe not. This is how I do it.

I'm not sure what else I could have done. They were pissed and nothing, NOTHING I could say would change that, so I just gave up and left. After what I'd done, I couldn't ask them to put up with any more. What did I do? Well, I wasted lots of good karma on a stupid stunt, thats what. More detail? Ok.

Overall, Dark Messiah is a decent enough game, but not for something based on a popular game license and an award-winning game engine. It's an amusing distraction, but that's all, and while it deserves praise for some of its more interesting elements, it hardly deserves top honors.

Gamegrene is looking for a few good writers. If you've got something to say -- be it a rant, a review, an advice column, or anything game related -- create an account and submit your content. Then drop aeon a note (aeon (at) aeforge.com) to let him know that it's ready for prime time.

I spent so much time in TCG's that I thought I'd never want to look at cards again. And here I am, playing games with cards in them. Whodda thunk it? But there are some excellent ones out there, and we'll look at two of them today.

Another in Whutaguy's series of TV show crossovers. This one is based on The New Red Green Show and G. I. Joe.

A review of Worlds of Empire for Star Hero.

You want Analog Games? You've come to the right place! This week: Trains around America :>. There are so many games out there, I'll take 'em one bite at a time, and will start with a pair of train games set in the United States. TransAmerica is set in no particular time and expects the winner to able to make use of the other players' networks, as all the trains are communal. Ticket to Ride is set at the turn of the last century (1900) and expects that the winner will claim the best routes as there are no provisions for sharing networks. At least in the U.S. version.

This week, Whutaguy reviews a recently released Hero System Sourcebook, You Gotta Have Character, a compilation of articles from Digital Hero E-zine.

It is all too easy for the GM to hide behind the screen, make mistakes, and have huge flaws in logic and planning. Through the course of any sustained campaign the players will come to know whether there are indeed any good mysteries behind the screen. By revealing inconsistencies in the story and execution the players can effectively pull down the curtain between player and GM.

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