Mention the words "Boot Hill" to most ordinary people and they'll respond with "Dodge City," a reference to the long-forgotten Wild West town which is home to the cemetery of that name. Mention Boot Hillto a gamer and they're likely to respond with "TSR," a reference to the soon-to-be-forgotten gaming company who, aside from revolutionizing the gaming industry with Dungeons & Dragons, managed to churn out a forgotten (but certainly not forgettable) Wild West RPG a couple decades ago.

After over a decade of anticipation, the Dungeons & Dragons movie is finally released nationwide today. I've not seen it yet, but I'm sure a lot of our readers certainly will, so let us know what you think by posting your reactions and reviews here.

There are fantasy games, and there are sci-fi games, and there are horror games, and there are cyberpunk games. And then there are those weird games that don't seem to fit in anywhere, the ones nobody talks about any more, the ones that have all but vanished over time. The Forgotten Games.

All good things must come to an end. Whether you consider this column a good thing or not is up for grabs, but the other half of the statement is certainly true, whether you choose to believe it or not. Belief being a pretty important thing, as I'll demonstrate in an exploration of 1989's Erik the Viking, by Terry Jones.

It's the one you love, but won't admit you've seen. It stars a high-flying fighter pilot, a Pink Floyd groupie, a Benny Hill girl and one of the Ewoks. And it's the product of the man who is arguably the most popular sci-fi/fantasy film director of all time. This week: 1988's Willow.

Tips? "Don't eat yellow snow." Role-playing tips? "Don't be the last player to leave because you'll get stuck cleaning up the DM's house." No, not those kinds of tips. Roleplaying Tips.com is an e-mail list which sends out an e-zine full of tips for Game Masters each week.

Perhaps the single most quoted fantasy movie (after Monty Python and the Holy Grail, of course) is The Princess Bride. I personally first encountered the film in college in 1993, six years after its initial release, and ever since then I've faithfully watched it each and every time it's come on television. It's that good.

 
 

My wife decided to take the day off and go visit her parents. This gave me the chance to indulge in an activity in which I am not normally allowed. An activity that every red-blooded male loves to indulge. Not porn, but Jackie Chan movies (this time). I rented the movie Project A and was struck with the great piratical gaming ideas that could come from it.

We follow the story of a GamesMaster, short one player for tonight's gaming session. His cure? Summon a demon from hell and stick him with the happiest do-gooder character there is: a paladin. This movie from the Breakfast of Demons only gets better...

Not much to say here from a reporting angle, other than Wizards has totally redesigned their website. In the process, they've relegated Dungeons & Dragons to a mere text link on the sidebar, one of 50 other links, with the same billing as Alternity, Star Wars and Marvel Super Heroes. More inside...

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